William Blake

1757-1827 British William Blake Galleries William Blake started writing poems as a boy, many of them inspired by religious visions. Apprenticed to an engraver as a young man, Blake learned skills that allowed him to put his poems and drawings together on etchings, and he began to publish his own work. Throughout his life he survived on small commissions, never gaining much attention from the London art world. His paintings were rejected by the public (he was called a lunatic for his imaginative work), but he had a profound influence on Romanticism as a literary movement.

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William Blake No title oil painting


No title
Painting ID::  53639
Artist: William Blake
Painting: No title
Introduction: mk234 1794
   
   
     

William Blake Job and his dottrar oil painting


Job and his dottrar
Painting ID::  53883
Artist: William Blake
Painting: Job and his dottrar
Introduction: mk234 1799-1800 27x38cm
   
   
     

William Blake sir james macdonald and sir alexander macdonald oil painting


sir james macdonald and sir alexander macdonald
Painting ID::  56119
Artist: William Blake
Painting: sir james macdonald and sir alexander macdonald
Introduction: mk247 1749,oil on canvas,69.5x58 in,176.5x147.5 cm,scottish national portait gallery,edinburgh,uk
   
   
     

William Blake Hecate or the Three Fates oil painting


Hecate or the Three Fates
Painting ID::  62538
Artist: William Blake
Painting: Hecate or the Three Fates
Introduction: 1795 Pen and ink with watercolour, 430 580 mm Tate Gallery, London Recently the painting is called The Night of Enitharmon's Joy. The many titles show the many levels of meaning, or the impenetrable mystery of Blake's work. Author: BLAKE, William Title: Hecate or the Three Fates Form: graphics , 1751-1800 , English , mythological
   
   
     

William Blake Los Entering the Grave oil painting


Los Entering the Grave
Painting ID::  62539
Artist: William Blake
Painting: Los Entering the Grave
Introduction: 1804-20 Etching with pen, watercolour and gold, 220 x 160 mm Yale Center for British Art, New Haven This is the frontispiece of the illustrated poem Jerusalem. In the coloured version of the frontispiece to his Jerusalem, Blake placed the thorns of the Passion beneath his own personification, Los, as he steps bravely through a door into a dark, grave-like void. This is not an end but the beginning: Los has embarked on an adventure, one hand raised in greeting and the other holding a blazing sun to illuminate the truths to be revealed in the following pages. Author: BLAKE, William Title: Los Entering the Grave Form: graphics , 1751-1800 , English , mythological
   
   
     

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     1757-1827 British William Blake Galleries William Blake started writing poems as a boy, many of them inspired by religious visions. Apprenticed to an engraver as a young man, Blake learned skills that allowed him to put his poems and drawings together on etchings, and he began to publish his own work. Throughout his life he survived on small commissions, never gaining much attention from the London art world. His paintings were rejected by the public (he was called a lunatic for his imaginative work), but he had a profound influence on Romanticism as a literary movement.