All Michelangelo Buonarroti 's Paintings
The Painting Names Are Sorted From A to Z


Choice ID Image  Painting (From A to Z)       Details 
82698 16th Century Painting  16th Century Painting   18.75 x 15.5 inches Date ca. 1550(1550) cyf
62937 Achim  Eliud  Achim Eliud   1511-12 Fresco, 215 x 430 cm Cappella Sistina, Vatican "Zadok begat Achim. Achim begat Eliud. Eliud begat Eliazar." (Matthew 1:14-15) This is the first lunette on the south wall. The identity of the figures is not certain, and it is not possible to establish which of the two, Achim or Eliud, is the old man with a child next to him on the left, and which the child held by his mother on the right. The elaborate pose of the old man is very carefully constructed with vigorous twisting of the limbs. The sculptural effect of the figure is largely due to the prominence of the knees and the crossed arms, with the right elbow projecting notably and the hands folded in toward the body. This effect is heightened by the magnificent arrangement of the drapery, especially on the left knee and over the edge of the stone seat. The meditative attitude of the old man is counterbalanced on the other side of the lunette by the fascinating spontaneity of the woman's gestures. Turning toward her child, she stretches out her arm to take some food from a plate placed on a stool in the foreground. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Achim - Eliud , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , , religious
62938 Achim Eliud  Achim Eliud   1511-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican Turning toward her child, the young woman stretches out her arm to take some food from a plate placed on a stool in the foreground. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Achim - Eliud (detail) , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , , religious
49507 Adams Creation  Adams Creation   mk198 1512 Sixtinska kapellet,Rom Placards collage,Young duck Rubicam,Bryssel
53723 Adams creation  Fran Sistine Chapel ceiling  Adams creation Fran Sistine Chapel ceiling   mk234 1511-12
44254 Ancestors of Christ  Ancestors of Christ   245 x 340 cm
44253 Ancestors of Christ figures  Ancestors of Christ figures   245 x 340 cm
62898 Ancestors of Christ: figures  Ancestors of Christ: figures   1509 Fresco, 245 x 340 cm Cappella Sistina, Vatican The figures are in the trianglar spandrel in the second bay between Joel and the Erythraean Sibyl. The spandrel is above the Zerubbabel-Abiud-Eliakim lunette. It is generally believed that Zerubbabel is depicted here, together with his parents and a brother. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Ancestors of Christ: figures Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62899 Ancestors of Christ: figures  Ancestors of Christ: figures   1511 Fresco, 240 x 340 cm Cappella Sistina, Vatican The figures are in the triangular spandrel in the eighth bay between the Libyan Sibyl and Daniel. The spandrel is above the Jesse-David-Solomon lunette. The absolute immobility of the enigmatic figure depicted frontally provides a triking contrast to the activity of the woman in the opposite spandrel. Placed precisely on the axis of the triangle, she appears to be deep in meditation and totally extraneous to the two figures - a man and a child - that may be discerned behind her in the darkness. In accordance with the lunette below, it can be assumed that Jesse as a child is depicted here together with his parents. The bronze nudes, with their backs turned toward the viewer, seem to be looking upward, like those above the opposit spandrel. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Ancestors of Christ: figures Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
52427 Asa - Jehoshaphat - Joram  Asa - Jehoshaphat - Joram   1511-12 Fresco, 215 x 430 cm
62939 Azor  Zadok  Azor Zadok   1511-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican "Eliakim begat Azor. Azor begat Zadok. Zadok begat Achim." (Matthew 1:13-14) This is the first lunette on the north wall. The absence of information regarding the figures represented has thwarted any attempt to identify them. On the left a seated woman is shown indicating something outside the lunette to a boy (or a girl) who seems to be engrossed in writing or drawing and turns somewhat hesitantly. The woman's pose, with its great naturalness and self-possession, is a variation on the twisted head, shoulders, and legs of the other figures. On the other side of the lunette, seen sideways on, but with his head turned toward the viewer, sits a solitary mature man, his face furrowed by deep lines. Tightly wrapped in his yellow ochre mantle, from which only his head and an arm emerge, he appears to be prey to distressing thoughts. The body, modelled concisely with great plastic power by the interplay of light and shade, and the pattern of the folds of the mantle, stands out clearly against the background. The number of figures present in this lunette is half that of the first lunettes painted by Michelangelo. This sense of isolation intensifies the expressive power of the figure of the pensive man, which some interpreted as being an imaginary self-portrait of the artist. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Azor - Zadok , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , , religious
63029 Bacchus  Bacchus   1497 Marble, height: 203 cm Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence At the age of 21 Michelangelo went to Rome for the first time. We still possess two of the works he created in this period (Bacchus and Piet?; others must have been lost for he spent five years there. The statue of Bacchus was commissioned by the banker Jacopo Galli for his garden and he wanted it fashioned after the models of the ancients. The body of this drunken and staggering god gives an impression of both youthfulness and of femininity. Vasari says that this strange blending of effects is the characteristic of the Greek god Dionysus. But in Michelangelo's experience, sensuality of such a divine nature has a drawback for man: in his left hand the god holds with indifference a lionsksin, the symbol of death, and a bunch of grapes, the symbol of life, from which a Faun is feeding. Thus we are brought to realize, in a sudden way, what significance this miracle of pure sensuality has for man: living only for a short while he will find himself in the position of the faun, caught in the grasp of death, the lionskin. The statue was transferred to Florence in 1572. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Bacchus , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , sculpture Type: mythological
62885 Battle of Cascina  Battle of Cascina   1505 Cartoon Private collection In the autumn of 1504 Michelangelo was given the commission to paint a battle scene for the Palazzo della Signoria as a companion piece to Leonardo's Battle of Anghiari. This grand project came to nothing: the cartoon was finished - at least in part - by February 1505, but the urgent summons from Pope Julius II prevented Michelangelo from continuing with the work, for which only some drawings survived. This picture shows a copy of the cartoon by Aristotile da San Gallo. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Battle of Cascina (part) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : historical
52449 Bronze nudes  Bronze nudes   1511 Fresco Cappella Sistina
30458 Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel  Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel   mk68 Fresco. 128x45 Vatican Chapel 1508-1512 Italy
63030 Christ Carrying the Cross  Christ Carrying the Cross   1521 Marble, height 205 cm Santa Maria sopra Minerva, Rome In this work, as in the 1499 Piet? Michelangelo did not portray pain as redemption in the medieval way, but perfect beauty as the expression of its consequence. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Christ Carrying the Cross , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , sculpture Type: religious
63031 Christ Carrying the Cross  Christ Carrying the Cross   1521 Marble Santa Maria sopra Minerva, Rome Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Christ Carrying the Cross (detail) , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , sculpture Type: religious
62891 Christ Crucified between the Virgin and Nicodemus  Christ Crucified between the Virgin and Nicodemus   1552-54 Black chalk, brown wash and white lead, 43,3 x 29 cm Musee du Louvre, Paris Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Christ Crucified between the Virgin and Nicodemus Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : religious
52696 Christ on the Cross  Christ on the Cross   c. 1541 Black and white chalk, 368 x 268 mm
62889 Cleopatra  Cleopatra   1533-34 Black chalk, 35,5 x 25 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Cleopatra Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : study
40366 Conversion of St.Paul  Conversion of St.Paul   mk156 1542-45 Fresco 625x661cm
40367 Conversion of St.Paul  Conversion of St.Paul   mk156 1542-45 Fresco 625x661cm
30455 Creation of Adam  Creation of Adam   mk68 Fresco Vatican,Sistine Chapel 1508-1511 Ltaly
52441 Creation of Eve  Creation of Eve   1509-10 Fresco Cappella Sistina
52443 Creation of the Sun, Moon, and Plants  Creation of the Sun, Moon, and Plants   1511 Fresco, 280 x 570 cm
62892 Crucifix  Crucifix   1556 Black chalk and white lead on paper, 412 x 279 mm British Museum, London The drawings Michelangelo did for his own personal use show us better than any of these other works something of the artist's development during his last years. The last of the six drawings of Crucifixions, depicting Christ on the cross between the Virgin and Saint John, is probably to be dated to 1556. This shows us, once again, those same ideas which had tormented the artist during his work on the PieteRondanini: "Oh! Flesh, Blood and Wood, supreme pain, Through you must I suffer my agony." These lines, which the artist had written at the age of 57, seem to convey the dominant feeling in the Madonna and Saint John, gathered around the Cross. Fear and pain have drawn the Madonna to Christ's body, while St. John turns towards Him in supplication, with one arm around the Cross. In this female figure there is nothing of the Mother of God represented in his 1499 Piete nor does the Evangelist recall anything of the 1505 St. Matthew. Nowhere are the changes of this half century so clearly demonstrated as in the life and work of Michelangelo Buonarroti. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Crucifix Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : religious
41521 Cumaean Sibyl  Cumaean Sibyl   mk164 c.1510 Sistine Chapel Rome
33459 Damned soul descending into Hell  Damned soul descending into Hell   mk86 1536-1541 Fresco 1375x1220cm Rome,Vatican Sistine Chapel
52450 David and Goliath  David and Goliath   1509 Fresco, 570 x 970 cm
62896 David and Goliath  David and Goliath   1509 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican A sheet of light descends from David's shoulder along the sleeve of his tunic (painted smalt-blue with lime-white reflections) to the head of Goliath, who is sprawled on the ground, stressing his centrality to the composition and highlighting the dramatic violence of the action. The composition was carefully planned in order to neutralize, as far as possible, the irregular shape of the field, dramatically forcing the predominant line of sight by means of the bold foreshortening of the two figures and the luminous convexity of the white tent, modeled with violet shadows. In the foreground, toward the lower vertex of the triangle, David's sling, lying on the ground, constitutes the starting point of the projection of the perspective along the central axis of the composition. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: David and Goliath (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62897 David and Goliath  David and Goliath   1509 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican David's head is boldly foreshortened and modeled with a dense network of soft brushstrokes. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: David and Goliath (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
44894 Dawn  Dawn   mk176 1524-34
33477 Delphic Sybyl  Delphic Sybyl   mk86 c.1506-1509 Fresco c.350x380cm Rome,Vatican Sistine Chapel
56633 den yttersta domen, sixinska kapellt  den yttersta domen, sixinska kapellt   mk248 fresken gav anda fran borjan uppbov till kontroverser. det buvudsakliga problemet var att kristus star i stallet i stallet for att sitta, som bibeln anger, den staende stallningen forefaller vara en mer befallande stallning,men som respons pasenare lagar mot nakenbet malade en annan konstnar dit de falska rygerna, i jambojd med kristus vanstra fot sitter martyren bartolomaios ocb balleer sin egen avfladda bud, i buden finns micbelangelos sjalvportratt.
34367 Die Erschaffung der Eva  Die Erschaffung der Eva   mk92 1510 170x260cm Rom,Sixtinische Kapelle
34368 Die Erschaffung der Eva  Die Erschaffung der Eva   mk92 1510 Fresko 355x380cm Sixtinische Kapelle
44260 Drunkenness of Noah  Drunkenness of Noah   170 x 260 cm
52433 Drunkenness of Noah  Drunkenness of Noah   1509 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The ninth
42654 Dying slave  Dying slave   MK169 ca.1513.Marmer height 229cm Louvre, Paris
62933 Eleazar  Eleazar   1511-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican In the left part of the lunette, Matthan, in the background, seems to be turning with an expression of astonishment or apprehension toward his wife, who, seated and seen in profile, plays with the child Jacob, who frisks on her knee. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Eleazar - Matthan (detail) , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , , religious
62934 Eleazar  Eleazar   1511-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican Eleazar, father of Matthan is generally believed to be the young man on the right. His head is seen in profile, and he appears to be immersed in his thoughts; his torso is seen frontally; his legs are crossed; his left arm is outstretched, his wrist lying across his raised right ankle, while his right arm, resting on a yellow cushion, is folded, his hand touching his shoulder. Behind him are visible the heads of a woman and a child. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Eleazar - Matthan (detail) , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , , religious
62905 Entombment  Entombment   1510 Tempera on wood, 159 x 149 cm National Gallery, London Both the attribution and the datation is doubtful. It is probable that the painting was executed by a pupil of Michelangelo with the active participation of the master. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Entombment Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
42657 Erythraeische sibille  Erythraeische sibille   MK169 detail of the ceiling Sixtijnse chapel, Vatican, Rome 1508-12 Fresco
44262 Expulsion from Garden of Eden  Expulsion from Garden of Eden   1509-10
52424 Exterior of the Sistine Chapel  Exterior of the Sistine Chapel   1475-83 - Cappella Sistina, Vatican Built between 1475 and 1483
62931 Exterior of the Sistine Chapel  Exterior of the Sistine Chapel   1475-83 - Cappella Sistina, Vatican This is a reconstruction of the original design of the Sistine Chapel seen from the northwest corner, with the crenellations and chemin-de-ronde, before the addition of the buttresses on the long walls, and before the altar wall windows were closed and other buildings raised alongside. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Exterior of the Sistine Chapel , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , , religious
53724 Extreme judgement  Sistine Chapel vastvagg  Extreme judgement Sistine Chapel vastvagg   mk234 1536 1463x1341cm
52440 Ezekiel  Ezekiel   1510 Fresco, 355 x 380 cm
52447 Frescoes above the altar wall  Frescoes above the altar wall   1508-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina
44263 Frescoes above the entrance wall  Frescoes above the entrance wall   1508-12
42658 God separates the waters and the country and blesses its work,  God separates the waters and the country and blesses its work,   MK169 detail of the ceiling Sixtijnse chapel Vatican, Rome. 1508-12
62923 he Persian Sibyl  he Persian Sibyl   1511 Fresco, 400 x 380 cm Cappella Sistina, Vatican Primordial, totally detached, her eyes focused on things outside this world, and she herself almost a cave of mystery - such is the Persica of the Sistine Chapel. Something of Leonardo's chiaroscuro has crept into her composition. She is a presence still more powerful and secretive, magical and abstracted than the Cumaean Sibyl. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: The Persian Sibyl Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
52425 Hezekiah - Manasseh  Hezekiah - Manasseh   1511-12 Fresco, 215 x 430 cm
30453 Holy Family  Holy Family   mk68 Tempera on panel diameter 3'11 1/4" Florence c.1503-1504 ltaly
33248 Holy Family  Holy Family   mk83 c.1504
33476 Holy Family  Holy Family   mk86 c.1504/05 Oil tempera on wood
44264 Ignudo  Ignudo   Oil on canvas
44265 Ignudo  Ignudo   Oil on canvas
44267 Ignudo  Ignudo   Oil on canvas
62915 Ignudo  Ignudo   1509 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The picture shows the head of the Ignudo at the upper right corner of 1he Drunkenness of Noah (above the Delphic Sibyl). Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Ignudo (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62918 Ignudo  Ignudo   Vatican The picture shows the Ignudo at the lower left corner of the Sacrifice of Noah (above the Erythraean Sibyl). The ignudi in the third bay are painted with greater fluency and the modeling is more delicate - with greater attention being paid to the reflections and the subtle effects of light and shade - than those of the first bay. Moreover, their poses are no longer wholly symmetrical. In fact, in the two figures on the left, only the lower part of the body is symmetrical, while the twisting of the bust and the head are expressions of contrapposto. The right arms of both are, however, extended toward the centre in order to hold the ribbon supporting the medallion. On the other hand, the ignudi on the right lean out toward the exterior, and the only difference between them appears to be the position of their arms. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Ignudo Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62919 Ignudo  Ignudo   Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The picture shows the Ignudo at the upper right corner of the Sacrifice of Noah (above the prophet Isaiah). The ignudi in the third bay are painted with greater fluency and the modeling is more delicate - with greater attention being paid to the reflections and the subtle effects of light and shade - than those of the first bay. Moreover, their poses are no longer wholly symmetrical. In fact, in the two figures on the left, only the lower part of the body is symmetrical, while the twisting of the bust and the head are expressions of contrapposto. The right arms of both are, however, extended toward the centre in order to hold the ribbon supporting the medallion. On the other hand, the ignudi on the right lean out toward the exterior, and the only difference between them appears to be the position of their arms. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Ignudo Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62920 Ignudo  Ignudo   1509-10 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The picture shows the Ignudo at the lower left corner of the Creation of Eve (above the prophet Ezekiel). In the four ignudi of the fifth bay who hold the yellow ribbons interwoven with the bronze-coloured medallions, the use of contrapposta with a variety of gestures and poses has now been replaced the symmetrical arrangement of figures. The relationship between the figures, placed opposite each other in pairs, is based on increasingly free and complex rhythmical correspondences, with rotating movements and pronounced bendings of the limbs. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Ignudo Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62921 Ignudo  Ignudo   1509-10 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The picture shows the Ignudo at the lower right corner of the Creation of Eve (above the Cumaean Sibyl). In the four ignudi of the fifth bay who hold the yellow ribbons interwoven with the bronze-coloured medallions, the use of contrapposta with a variety of gestures and poses has now been replaced the symmetrical arrangement of figures. The relationship between the figures, placed opposite each other in pairs, is based on increasingly free and complex rhythmical correspondences, with rotating movements and pronounced bendings of the limbs. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Ignudo Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62924 Ignudo  Ignudo   Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The picture shows the Ignudo at the lower left corner of the Separation of the Earth from the Waters (above the Persian Sibyl). The poses of the pairs of ignudi become gradually more dynamic and agitated. The two above the Persian Sibyl (at the left) bend backward in opposite directions, while one of those above the prophet Daniel (at right) bends forward, casting an apprehensive glance at the viewer, and the other raises his arm in a movement reminiscent of Hellenistic sculptures of dancing fauns. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Ignudo Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62925 Ignudo  Ignudo   1511 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The picture shows the Ignudo at the lower right corner of the Separation of the Earth from the Waters (above the prophet Daniel). The poses of the pairs of ignudi become gradually more dynamic and agitated. The two above the Persian Sibyl (at the left) bend backward in opposite directions, while one of those above the prophet Daniel (at right) bends forward, casting an apprehensive glance at the viewer, and the other raises his arm in a movement reminiscent of Hellenistic sculptures of dancing fauns. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Ignudo Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62926 Ignudo  Ignudo   1511 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The picture shows the Ignudo at the upper right corner of the Separation of the Earth from the Waters (above the prophet Daniel). The poses of the pairs of ignudi become gradually more dynamic and agitated. The two above the Persian Sibyl (at the left) bend backward in opposite directions, while one of those above the prophet Daniel (at right) bends forward, casting an apprehensive glance at the viewer, and the other raises his arm in a movement reminiscent of Hellenistic sculptures of dancing fauns. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Ignudo Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
52419 Interior of the Sistine Chapel  Interior of the Sistine Chapel   1475-83, 1508-12, 1535-41
52420 Interior of the Sistine Chapel  Interior of the Sistine Chapel   1475-83, 1508-12, 1535-41
52421 Interior of the Sistine Chapel  Interior of the Sistine Chapel   1475-83, 1508-12 - Cappella Sistina
62935 Jacob  Jacob   1511-12 Fresco, 215 x 430 cm Cappella Sistina, Vatican "Matthan begat Jacob. Jacob begat Joseph, the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ." (Matthew 1:15-16) At the top of the entrance wall of the chapel, to the right of the viewer, next to the Eleazar-Matthan lunette, there is the one concluding the genealogical sequence of the ancestors of Christ in the Gospel of St Matthew. Sullen and perplexed, wrapped in a huge yellow ochre cloak and seemingly withdrawn, the old man - generally believed to be Jacob - dominates the family group on the left due to his expressive power and the quality of the colour. Similarly, on the right, the female figure, usually thought to be Mary, is more prominent than the other members of the Holy Family and the child holding a mirror. Behind Mary in the shadow, Joseph holds the Christ child, who stretches out an arm toward the round mirror held out at the height of his face by a naked female child, possibly an allegory of the Church. The compositional schemes of the two neighbouring lunettes correspond: in both there is a female figure in the foreground seen in full, or half, profile and facing the outer wall of the chapel, and a male figure, on the internal side, with his torso seen frontally. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Jacob - Joseph , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , , religious
62936 Jacob  Jacob   1511-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican Mary, wrapped in a rose mantle which covers her yellow dress and its greenish shadows, wearing an exotic hairdress, turns toward the spectator. She is more prominent than the other members of the Holy Family behind her in the shadow: Joseph and the Christ child. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Jacob - Joseph (detail) , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , , religious
52445 Jeremiah  Jeremiah   1511 Fresco, 390 x 380 cm
52429 Jesse - David - Solomon  Jesse - David - Solomon   1511 Fresco, 215 x 430 cm
62895 Judith and Holofernes  Judith and Holofernes   1509 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican In the fresco, almost in the center and nearest to the viewer, the figures of the two women stand out in the bright light against the white wall placed obliquely in the background. Judith is portrayed as she is about to place a cloth over the severed head of Holofernes, which the maidservant is carrying in a tray held on her head. The biblical heroine's face is hidden because she is looking toward the darkened room on the right where, sprawled on the white sheets of the bed, the headless body of the general, depicted with complex foreshortening, appears still to be in a state of frenzied agitation. Judith and the maidservant form a compact group that is given prominence by strong contrasts and passages of very bright colours: the smalt-blue of Judith's bonnet and dress and the yellow of the borders and oversleeve; the delicate green, with rose-white reflections, of the tunic and the crimson of the belt and sash, repeated with darker tones in the maidservant's tunic, which is lined with deep violet that stands out against the yellow with iridescent greenish shadows of the dress. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Judith and Holofernes (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
30494 Last Judgement  Last Judgement   mk68 Fresco, Vatican,Sistine Chapel 1536-1541 Italy
44256 Last Judgment  Last Judgment   1537-41
62904 Last Judgment  Last Judgment   1370 x 1220 cm Cappella Sistina, Vatican This fresco was commissioned by Pope Clement VII (1523-1534) shortly before his death. His successor, Paul III Farnese (1534-1549), forced Michelangelo to a rapid execution of this work, the largest single fresco of the century. The first impression we have when faced with the Last Judgment is that of a truly universal event, at the centre of which stands the powerful figure of Christ. His raised right hand compels the figures on the lefthand side, who are trying to ascend, to be plunged down towards Charon and Minos, the Judge of the Underworld; while his left hand is drawing up the chosen people on his right in an irresistible current of strength. Together with the planets and the sun, the saints surround the Judge, confined into vast spacial orbits around Him. For this work Michelangelo did not choose one set point from which it should be viewed. The proportions of the figures and the size of the groups are determined, as in the Middle Ages, by their single absolute importance and not by their relative significance. For this reason, each figure preserves its own individuality and both the single figures arid the groups need their own background. The figures who, in the depths of the scene, are rising from their graves could well be part of the prophet Ezechiel's vision. Naked skeletons are covered with new flesh, men dead for immemorable lengths of time help each other to rise from the earth. For the representation of the place of eternal damnation, Michelangelo was clearly inspired by the lines of the Divine Comedy: Charon the demon, with eyes of glowing coal/Beckoning them, collects them all,/Smites with his oar whoever lingers. According to Vasari, the artist gave Minos, the Judge of the Souls, the semblance of the Pope's Master of Ceremonies, Biagio da Cesena, who had often complained to the Pope about the nudity of the painted figures. We know that many other figures, as well, are portraits of Michelangelo's contemporaries. The artist's self-portrait appears twice: in the flayed skin which Saint Bartholomew is carrying in his left-hand, and in the figure in the lower left hand corner, who is looking encouragingly at those rising from their graves. The artist could not have left us clearer evidence of his feeling towards life and of his highest ideals. The painting is a turning point in the history of art. Vasari predicted the phenomenal impact of the work: "This sublime painting", he wrote, "should serve as a model for our art. Divine Providence has bestowed it upon the world to show how much intelligence she can deal out to certain men on earth. The most expert draftsman trembles as he contemplates these bold outlines and marvellous foreshortenings. In the presence of this celestial work, the senses are paralysed, and one can only wonder at the works that came before and the works that shall come after". Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Last Judgment Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62913 Last Judgment  Last Judgment   1537-41 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The picture shows the Archangel St Michael with the Book of Elects. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Last Judgment (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62914 Last Judgment  Last Judgment   1537-41 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The picture shown is a detail of the lower right part depicting Charon. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Last Judgment (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
52453 Laurentian Library  Laurentian Library   1530 - Biblioteca Medicea
52423 Lunette and Popes  Lunette and Popes   1475-83, 1508-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina
63026 Madonna and Child with the Infant Baptist  Madonna and Child with the Infant Baptist   1505-06 Marble, diameter: 82,5 cm The Royal Academy of Arts, London This tondo explores the problems of composing a meaningful group within a circle, with a precise definition of the spatial planes and relationships within the picture space. The Doni Tondo, his only finished panel painting, and another marble relief, the Pitti Tondo deal with the same problems. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Madonna and Child with the Infant Baptist (Taddei Tondo) , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , sculpture Type: religious
62888 Male Nude  Male Nude   1504-06 Black chalk with white highlights, 40,5 x 22,6 cm Teylers Museum, Haarlem The picture shows a male nude and two studies for The Battle of Cascina. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Male Nude Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : study
44258 Martyrdom of St Peter  Martyrdom of St Peter   1546-50 Fresco, 625 x 662 cm
62911 Martyrdom of St Peter  Martyrdom of St Peter   1546-50 Fresco, width of detail 108 cm Cappella Paolina, Palazzi Pontifici, Vatican The detail shows figures from the right side of the fresco. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Martyrdom of St Peter (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
52434 Medallion  Medallion   c. 135 cm Cappella Sistina
63014 Medici Madonna  Medici Madonna   1521-31 Marble Sagrestia Nuova, San Lorenzo, Florence Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Medici Madonna (detail) , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , sculpture Type: religious
52431 Nahshon  Nahshon   1511-12 Fresco, 215 x 430 cm
63022 Pius  Pius   1501-04 Marble, height: 134 cm Duomo, Siena The garment of a prince of the Church in full dress cannot be dramatized in the same way as that of an apostle. Michelangelo divided up the task in Siena as a medieval master would have done: he kept the apostles in the lower register for himself; he left the popes in the register above that to Baccio da Montelupo because they are artistically less interesting and are not seen at quite such close range. Pius was particularly sacred to the Piccolomini, because in the person of Enea Silvio, who chose the name Pius II (1458-1464), they had provided their first pope. He founded the town of Pienza. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Pius , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , sculpture Type: religious
62910 Plan for a Church  Plan for a Church   . 1560 Ink Casa Buonarroti, Florence During the last ten years of his life Michelangelo mainly drew plans for new buildings and perhaps for further sculpture. After his reconciliation with Cosimo de' Medici, he designed new plans for San Giovanni dei Fiorentini in Florence. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Plan for a Church Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : study
42655 plfond of the Sixtijnse chapel Rome Vatican  plfond of the Sixtijnse chapel Rome Vatican   MK169 1508-12 Fresco 13.7x39m
62912 Porta Pia begun  Porta Pia begun   1562 - Porta Pia, Rome Traces of Michelangelo's architectural activities are found in some parts of Rome. There are, for example, the sombre, crenellated bastions of the Porta Pia, where it is evident that the architect was primarily a sculptor. The central section, belonging to the 19th century, greatly weakens the dignified appearance of the original. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Porta Pia Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : other
52451 Punishment of Haman  Punishment of Haman   1511 Fresco, 585 x 985 cm
62900 Punishment of Haman  Punishment of Haman   1511 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican On the left of the pendentive, Esther reveals Haman's plot to Ahasueras. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Punishment of Haman (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62901 Punishment of Haman  Punishment of Haman   Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican On the right of the pendentive, the king sends Haman to provide royal apparel for Mordecai, who is sitting at the king's door. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Punishment of Haman (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
52428 Rehoboam - Abijah  Rehoboam - Abijah   1511-12 Fresco, 215 x 430 cm
52448 Roma) Judith and Holofernes  Roma) Judith and Holofernes   1509 Fresco, 570 x 970 cm
52438 Sacrifice of Noah  Sacrifice of Noah   1509 Fresco, 170 x 260 cm
52430 Salmon - Boaz - Obed  Salmon - Boaz - Obed   1511-12 Fresco, 215 x 430 cm
52446 Separation of Light from Darkness  Separation of Light from Darkness   1511 Fresco, 180 x 260 cm
42656 Sixtijnse chapel with the ceiling painting  Sixtijnse chapel with the ceiling painting   MK169 1534-41
62878 St Anne with the Virgin and the Christ Child  St Anne with the Virgin and the Christ Child   1505 Pen, 254 x 177 mm Ashmolean Museum, Oxford The challenge of this subject is the placement of one grown woman on the lap of another without creating an awkward appearance. Michelangelo dealt with a similar problem already in his Roman Piete a subject which required the placement of an adult male on the lap of a woman. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: St Anne with the Virgin and the Christ Child Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : religious
63021 St Peter  St Peter   1501-04 Marble Duomo, Siena Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: St Peter , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , sculpture Type: religious
63024 St Petronius  St Petronius   1494 Marble, height: 64 cm with base San Domenico, Bologna In 1494 Michelangelo worked on the shrine of St Dominic, for which he carved this statue of St Petronius which echoes Donatello and Jacopo della Quercia. (The companion statue of St Proculus testifies to Michelangelo's studies of Masaccio and Donatello.) Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: St Petronius , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , sculpture Type: religious
63025 St Proculus  St Proculus   1494 Marble, height: 58,5 cm with base San Domenico, Bologna In 1494 Michelangelo worked on the shrine of St Dominic, for which he carved this statue of St Proculus which echoes Masaccio and Donatello. (The companion statue of St Petronius testifies to Michelangelo's studies of Donatello and Jacopo della Quercia.) Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: St Proculus , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , sculpture Type: religious
62906 Study  Study   1525 Ink Casa Buonarroti, Florence The picture shows a study for the fortifications of Porta del Prato in Florence. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Study Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : study
62893 Study for a Deposition  Study for a Deposition   1555 Red chalk on paper Ashmolean Museum, Oxford Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Study for a Deposition Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : study
62879 Study for a Madonna and Child  Study for a Madonna and Child   1533 Black chalk on paper British Museum, London Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Study for a Madonna and Child Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : study
62886 Study for a Nude  Study for a Nude   1504 Pen and ink over black chalk, 408 x 284 mm Casa Buonarroti, Florence It is assumed but not proved that Michelangelo made this study for the Battle of Cascina. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Study for a Nude Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : study
62887 Study for the Battle of Cascina  Study for the Battle of Cascina   1505-06 Chalk and silver rod on paper, 235 x 356 mm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence The attribution of this drawing to Michelangelo is debated. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Study for the Battle of Cascina Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : study
62880 Study for the Colonna Piet  Study for the Colonna Piet   1538 Chalk Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston In 1538, three years before the completion of the Last Judgment, Michelangelo had met Vittoria Colonna. She belonged to the circle of Juan Valdes, who was striving towards an internal reform of the Catholic Church. To put it very simply, one can say that the main conviction of this theological trend was the idea of the utmost need of faith, as opposed to good deeds or sacraments, because, in the last resort, it is only divine grace which is all-powerful. These almost protestant beliefs could not conquer, or in any way change, Michelangelo because too much of his work would have had to be denied. However, they must have to some extent disrupted his firm belief, as he had expressed it in his works, that by creating perfect physical beauty he had represented the essence of the supernatural and of the divine. It is true, however, that he felt the need for divine grace, and, from this point onwards, this had great bearing on his creative life. We find evidence of this in a drawing of the Piete made for Vittoria Colonna. When compared with the 1499 Piete we see clearly that the main objective is the thought of the Compassionate Christ and of the Redemption through Christ's Blood. The work turns openly towards the onlooker to admonish him, drawing his attention to the sacrifice of Golgotha. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Study for the Colonna Piete Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : study
62907 Study of a Head  Study of a Head   1530 Red chalk, 33,5 x 26,9 cm Casa Buonarroti, Florence Michelangelo seems to have conceived only one erotic painting involving a woman, the Leda and the Swan. The painting is lost, only this very fine read chalk study of a head has survived. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: Study of a Head Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : study
52452 The Brazen Serpent  The Brazen Serpent   1511 Fresco, 585 x 985 cm
62902 The Brazen Serpent  The Brazen Serpent   1511 Fresco, 585 x 985 cm Cappella Sistina, Vatican The scenes painted in the pendentives at the sides of prophet Jonah are characterized by the use of pronounced foreshortening. This is the case with the tangled group of Israelites who, in the scene of the Brazen Serpent, writhe in the throes of death, and, above all, with the crucified figure of Haman in the Punishment of Haman. In the Brazen Serpent, the mass of bodies poisoned by the snakes occupies the whole of the right part, spreading toward the center. The survivors are grouped on the left, eyes and arms turned imploringly toward the salvafic image of the brazen serpent. The cruel punishment of the Israelites for having spoken against God and Moses occupies a large part of the pendentive, with bodies intertwined in an indescribable tangle. This presented the artist with an opportunity for virtuosic foreshortening and twisting of the bodies, and also depicting contorted, screaming faces. Much admired by Vasari, the group is a striking forerunner of the spectacular motifs that were, in the following decades, typical of the current of Mannerism comprising Giulio Romano and Vasari himself. The Biblical story (Num. 21 :4-9) The Israelites, discontented with life in the desert, spoke out against God and Moses. They were punished with a plague of poisonous snakes which only increased their hardships. Many died of snakebite. When the people repented, Moses sought God's advice how they should be rid of the snakes. He was told to make an image of one and set it on a pole. Whoever was bitten would be cured when he looked upon the image. Moses accordingly made a serpent of brass on a tau-shaped (T) pole, which proved to have a miraculous curative effect. Representation in Art The Israelites are depicted writhing on the ground, their limbs entwined by snakes. Moses, sometimes with Aaron, stands beside the brazen serpent. John's gospel furnishes the typological parallel: 'This Son of Man must be lifted up as the serpent was lifted up by Moses in the wilderness.' Medieval art juxtaposed the subject with the serpent in the Garden of Eden entwining the Tree of Knowledge. Both probably derive from an ancient and widespread fertility image, the 'asherah', associated with the worship of Astarte, which consisted of a snake and a tree representing respectively the male and female elements. King Hezekiah destroyed the asherah, by inference the one made by Moses, at a time when the Israelites were relapsing into idolatry (II Kings 18:4). The presence and the identification of Moses in Michelangelo's fresco is debated. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: The Brazen Serpent Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62903 The Brazen Serpent  The Brazen Serpent   1511 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican The cruel punishment of the Israelites for having spoken against God and Moses occupies a large part of the pendentive, with bodies intertwined in an indescribable tangle. This presented the artist with an opportunity for virtuosic foreshortening and twisting of the bodies, and also depicting contorted, screaming faces. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: The Brazen Serpent (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
52422 The ceiling  The ceiling   1508-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina
44879 The Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel  The Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel   mk176 1508-12
44257 The Conversion of Saul  The Conversion of Saul   1542-45 Fresco, 625 x 661 cm
62881 The Conversion of Saul  The Conversion of Saul   1542-45 Fresco, width of detail 114 cm Cappella Paolina, Palazzi Pontifici, Vatican The detail shows soldiers on the left side of the fresco. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: The Conversion of Saul (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
62882 The Conversion of Saul  The Conversion of Saul   1542-45 Fresco, width of detail 101 cm Cappella Paolina, Palazzi Pontifici, Vatican The detail shows St Paul and a soldier. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: The Conversion of Saul (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
31358 The Creation of Adam  The Creation of Adam   nn07 1508-1512
33478 The Creation of Adam  The Creation of Adam   mk86 c.1510 Fresco c.280x570cm Rome,Vatican,Sistine Chapel
39444 The crucifixion of the Hl. Petrus  The crucifixion of the Hl. Petrus   mk148 late fresco of Michelangelo(1475-1564) in the Cappella Paolina, Vatican
62922 The Cumaean Sibyl  The Cumaean Sibyl   1510 Fresco, 375 x 380 cm Cappella Sistina, Vatican The Cumaean Sibyl oppresses by the sheer weight of her bulk and a commanding ugliness. With the open folio bound in green and her two genii gazing at its pages over her shoulders she has become one of the Fates, a towering shape with human features. Whenever Sibyls are mentioned, the Cumaea at once comes to mind. In the art of Michelangelo and other painters her powerful presence overshadows every other Sibyl, even her younger and more beautiful sisters, such as the Delphica. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: The Cumaean Sibyl Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
44268 The Delphic Sibyl  The Delphic Sibyl   350 x 380 cm
62916 The Delphic Sibyl  The Delphic Sibyl   1509 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican In the center of the face - seen frontally, half in the light and half in a moderate shadow - there are traces of a crossincised to mark the vertical axis of the oval and the alignment of the eyes. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: The Delphic Sibyl (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
52436 The Deluge  The Deluge   1508-09 Fresco, 280 x 570 cm
23384 The Doni Tondo (nn03)  The Doni Tondo (nn03)   c 1503/4 Tempera on panel diam 120 cm diam 47 1/4 in Galleria degli Uffizi Florence
42964 The Entombment  The Entombment   mk170 1497-1498 Oil on wood 161.7x149.9cm
44269 The Erythraean Sibyl  The Erythraean Sibyl   360 x 380 cm
62917 The Erythraean Sibyl  The Erythraean Sibyl   1509 Fresco Cappella Sistina, Vatican Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: The Erythraean Sibyl (detail) Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : religious
44261 The Fall and Expulsion from Garden of Eden  The Fall and Expulsion from Garden of Eden   1509-10 Fresco, 280 x 570 cm
62908 The Fall of Phaeton  The Fall of Phaeton   1533 Chalk British Museum, London In Greek mythology Phaeton was the son of Helios, the sun-god. Helios drove his golden chariot, a 'quadriga' yoked to a team of four horses abreast, daily across the sky. Phaeton persuaded his unwilling father to allow him for one day to drive his chariot across the skies. Because he had no skill he was soon in trouble, and the climax came when he met the fearful Scorpion of the zodiac. He dropped the reins, the horses bolted and caused the earth itself to catch fire. In the nick of time Jupiter, father of the goods, put a stop to his escapade with a thunderbolt which wrecked the chariot and sent Phaeton hurtling down in flames into the River Eridanus (according to some, the Po). He was buried by nymphs. Phaetons's reckless attempt to drive his father's chariot made him the symbol of all who aspire to that which lies beyond their capabilities. The fall of Phaeton was a popular theme, common in Renaissance and Baroque painting, especially on ceilings in the later period. Phaeton, the chariot, and four horses, reins flying, all tumble headlong out of the sky. Above, Jupiter throws a thunderbolt. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: The Fall of Phaeton Date: 1501-1550 Italian , graphics : religious
52432 The first bay of the ceiling  The first bay of the ceiling   1508-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina
52439 The fourth bay of the ceiling  The fourth bay of the ceiling   1508-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina
44255 The Holy Family with the infant St. John the Baptist  The Holy Family with the infant St. John the Baptist   c. 1506 Tempera on panel, diameter 120 cm
29033 The Holy Family with the Young St.John the Baptist  The Holy Family with the Young St.John the Baptist   mk65 Oil on panel 47 1/4in Uffizi,Gllery
40292 The Holy Family with the Young St.John the Baptist  The Holy Family with the Young St.John the Baptist   mk153 c.1506 Oil on panel
40357 The Last  judgment  The Last judgment   mk156 1536-40 Fresco 12.2x13.7cm
44896 The Last Judgment  The Last Judgment   mk176 1536-41
56018 the last judgment  the last judgment   mk247 1535 to 41 ,fresco,540x480 in,1370x1220 cm,sistine chapel,vatican city,ltaly
52418 The Libyan Sibyl  The Libyan Sibyl   1511 Fresco, 395 x 380 cm
42965 THe Madonna and Child with Saint John and Angels  THe Madonna and Child with Saint John and Angels   mk170 circa 1500 Tempera on wood 104.5x77cm
52444 The ninth bay of the ceiling  The ninth bay of the ceiling   1508-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina,
52435 The second bay of the ceiling  The second bay of the ceiling   1508-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina
52442 The seventh bay of the ceiling  The seventh bay of the ceiling   1508-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina
56704 the sistine chapel ceiling  the sistine chapel ceiling   mk247 1508 to 12,fresco ,sistine chapel,vatican city,ltaly
52437 The third bay of the ceiling  The third bay of the ceiling   1508-12 Fresco Cappella Sistina
39424 The victim Noachs  The victim Noachs   mk148 around 1510, cover painting in the Sixtinischen chapel, Rome. after this victim God closed its pact with Noach gene 8.20) and it that" laws Noachs" given
63011 Tomb of Giuliano de' Medici  Tomb of Giuliano de' Medici   1526-33 Marble, 630 x 420 cm Sagrestia Nuova, San Lorenzo, Florence Michelangelo received the commission for the Medici Chapel in 1520 from the Medici Pope Leo X (1513-23). The Pope wanted to combine the tombs of his younger brother Giuliano, Duke of Nemours, and his nephew Lorenzo, Duke of Urbino, with those of the "Magnifici", Lorenzo and his brother Giuliano, who had been murdered in 1478; their tombs were then in the Old Sacristy of San Lorenzo. The plans for the chapel which we still have, shows us that the Pope allowed Michelangelo a great freedom in his task. Not much of this vast plan was in fact carried out, yet it is enough to give us an idea of what Michelangelo's overall conception must have been. Each of the Dukes' tombs is divided into two areas, and the border is well marked by a projecting cornice. In the lower part are the sarcophagi with the mortal remains of the Dukes, on which lie Twilight and Dawn, Night and Day as the symbol of the vanity of things. Above this temporal area, the nobility of the figures of the Dukes and the subtlety of the richly decorated architecture which surrounds them represent a higher sphere: the abode of the free and redeemed spirit. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Tomb of Giuliano de' Medici , 1501-1550
63012 Tomb of Giuliano de' Medici  Tomb of Giuliano de' Medici   1526-33 Marble Sagrestia Nuova, San Lorenzo, Florence Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Tomb of Giuliano de' Medici (detail) , 1501-1550
63013 Tomb of Lorenzo de' Medici  Tomb of Lorenzo de' Medici   1524-31 Marble Sagrestia Nuova, San Lorenzo, Florence Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Painting Title: Tomb of Lorenzo de' Medici (detail) , 1501-1550 Painting Style: Italian , sculpture Type: religious
52426 Uzziah - Jotham - Ahaz  Uzziah - Jotham - Ahaz   1511-12 Fresco, 215 x 430 cm
62909 View of the Chapel  View of the Chapel   Palazzi Pontifici, Vatican Between 1537 and 1540, Antonio da Sangallo the Younger built the Pauline Chapel in the Vatican, as Pope's (Paul III) private chapel. In 1541 Michelangelo was asked to decorate the central parts of the two longer walls with two frescoes. The first, The Conversion of Saint Paul, was begun in 1542; the second, the Martyrdom of St Peter, was painted between 1546 and 1550. Before this, no one had ever attempted to place these two themes next to each other. Michelangelo portrays what is by this time his plan of life: death for the faith must follow conversion and be its confirmation. To Paul, who has fallen and has been forced to shut his eyes because of the brilliance of divine light, he gives his own face and makes Peter, nailed to the cross, in the supreme tension of the last moment of life, forcefully look at the spectator. Artist: MICHELANGELO Buonarroti Title: View of the Chapel Date: 1501-1550 Italian , painting : other
44259 Zechariah  Zechariah   1509 360 x 390 cm

Michelangelo Buonarroti
b Caprese 1475 d Rome 1564 Born: March 6, 1475 Caprese, Italy Died: February 18, 1564 Rome, Italy Italian artist Michelangelo was one of the greatest sculptors of the Italian Renaissance and one of its greatest painters and architects. Early life Michelangelo Buonarroti was born on March 6, 1475, in Caprese, Italy, a village where his father, Lodovico Buonarroti, was briefly serving as a Florentine government agent. The family moved back to Florence before Michelangelo was one month old. Michelangelo's mother died when he was six. From his childhood Michelangelo was drawn to the arts, but his father considered this pursuit below the family's social status and tried to discourage him. However, Michelangelo prevailed and was apprenticed (worked to learn a trade) at the age of thirteen to Domenico Ghirlandaio (1449?C1494), the most fashionable painter in Florence at the time. After a year Michelangelo's apprenticeship was broken off. The boy was given access to the collection of ancient Roman sculpture of the ruler of Florence, Lorenzo de' Medici (1449?C1492). He dined with the family and was looked after by the retired sculptor who was in charge of the collection. This arrangement was quite unusual at the time. Early works Michelangelo's earliest sculpture, the Battle of the Centaurs (mythological creatures that are part man and part horse), a stone work created when he was about seventeen, is regarded as remarkable for the simple, solid forms and squarish proportions of the figures, which add intensity to their violent interaction. Soon after Lorenzo died in 1492, the Medici family fell from power and Michelangelo fled to Bologna. In 1494 he carved three saints for the church of San Domenico. They show dense forms, in contrast to the linear forms which were then dominant in sculpture. Rome After returning to Florence briefly, Michelangelo moved to Rome. There he carved a Bacchus for a banker's garden of ancient sculpture. This is Michelangelo's earliest surviving large-scale work, and his only sculpture meant to be viewed from all sides. In 1498 the same banker commissioned Michelangelo to carve the Piet?? now in St. Peter's. The term piet?? refers to a type of image in which Mary supports the dead Christ across her knees. Larger than life size, the Piet?? contains elements which contrast and reinforce each other: vertical and horizontal, cloth and skin, alive and dead, female and male. Florence On Michelangelo's return to Florence in 1501 he was recognized as the most talented sculptor of central Italy. He was commissioned to carve the David for the Florence Cathedral. Michelangelo's Battle of Cascina was commissioned in 1504; several sketches still exist. The central scene shows a group of muscular soldiers climbing from a river where they had been swimming to answer a military alarm. This fusion of life with colossal grandeur henceforth was the special quality of Michelangelo's art. From this time on, Michelangelo's work consisted mainly of very large projects that he never finished. He was unable to turn down the vast commissions of his great clients which appealed to his preference for the grand scale. Pope Julius II (1443?C1513) called Michelangelo to Rome in 1505 to design his tomb, which was to include about forty life-size statues. Michelangelo worked on the project off and on for the next forty years. Sistine Chapel In 1508 Pope Julius II commissioned Michelangelo to decorate the ceiling of the chief Vatican chapel, the Sistine. The traditional format of ceiling painting contained only single figures. Michelangelo introduced dramatic scenes and an original framing system, which was his earliest architectural design. The chief elements are twelve male and female prophets (the latter known as sibyls) and nine stories from Genesis. Michelangelo stopped for some months halfway along. When he returned to the ceiling, his style underwent a shift toward a more forceful grandeur and a richer emotional tension than in any previous work. The images of the Separation of Light and Darkness, and Ezekiel illustrate this greater freedom and mobility. After the ceiling was completed in 1512, Michelangelo returned to the tomb of Julius and carved a Moses and two Slaves. His models were the same physical types he used for the prophets and their attendants in the Sistine ceiling. Julius's death in 1513 halted the work on his tomb. Pope Leo X, son of Lorenzo de' Medici, proposed a marble facade for the family parish church of San Lorenzo in Florence to be decorated with statues by Michelangelo. After four years of quarrying and designing the project was canceled. Medici Chapel In 1520 Michelangelo was commissioned to execute the Medici Chapel for two young Medici dukes. It contains two tombs, each with an image of the deceased and two allegorical (symbolic) figures: Day and Night on one tomb, and Morning and Evening on the other. A library, the Biblioteca Laurenziana, was built at the same time on the opposite side of San Lorenzo to house Pope Leo X's books. The entrance hall and staircase are some of Michelangelo's most astonishing architecture, with recessed columns resting on scroll brackets set halfway up the wall and corners stretched open rather than sealed. Poetry Michelangelo wrote many poems in the 1530s and 1540s. Approximately three hundred survive. The earlier poems are on the theme of Neoplatonic love (belief that the soul comes from a single undivided source to which it can unite again) and are full of logical contradictions and intricate images. The later poems are Christian. Their mood is penitent (being sorrow and regretful); and they are written in a simple, direct style. Last Judgment In 1534 Michelangelo left Florence for the last time, settling in Rome. The next ten years were mainly given over to painting for Pope Paul III (1468?C1549).